End of Year Money Moves

 

What has changed for you in 2021?

For some, this year has been as complicated as learning a new dance. Did you start a new job or leave a job behind? That’s one step. Did you retire? There’s another step. If notable changes took place in your personal or professional life, then you may want to review your finances before this year ends and 2022 begins. Proving that you have all the right moves in 2021 might put you in a better position to tango with 2022.

Even if your 2021 has been relatively uneventful, the end of the year is still an excellent time to get cracking and see where you can manage your overall personal finances. 

Keep in mind that this article is for informational purposes only and is not a replacement for real-life advice. Please consult your tax, legal and accounting professionals before modifying your tax strategy.

 

Do you engage in tax-loss harvesting?

That’s the practice of taking capital losses (selling securities for less than what you first paid for them) to manage capital gains. You might want to consider this move, but it should be made with the guidance of a financial professional you trust.1 

In fact, you could even take it a step further. Consider that up to $3,000 of capital losses in excess of capital gains can be deducted from ordinary income, and any remaining capital losses above that amount can be carried forward to offset capital gains in upcoming years.1

 

Do you want to itemize deductions?

You may want to take the standard deduction for the 2021 tax year, which has risen to $12,550 for single filers and $25,100 for joint. If you think it might be better for you to itemize, now would be a good time to gather the receipts and assorted paperwork.2,3

 

Are you thinking of gifting?

How about donating to a qualified charity or non-profit organization before 2021 ends? Your gift may qualify as a tax deduction. For some gifts, you may be required to itemize deductions using Schedule A.4

While we’re on the topic of year-end moves, why not take a moment to review a portion of your estate strategy? Specifically, take a look at your beneficiary designations. If you haven’t reviewed these designations for some time, double check to see that these assets are structured to go where you want them to go in the event that you pass away. Lastly, look at your will to make sure it is still valid and up-to-date. 

Check on the amount you have withheld. If you discover that you have withheld too little on your W-4 form so far, you may need to adjust this withholding before the year ends.

 

What can you do before ringing in the New Year?

New Year’s Eve may put you in a dancing mood, eager to say goodbye to the old year and welcome 2022. Before you put on your dancing shoes, though, consider speaking with a financial or tax professional. Do it now, rather than in February or March. Small end-of-year moves might help you improve your short-term and long-term financial situation.

    1. https://www.investopedia.com/articles/taxes/08/tax-loss-harvesting.asp
    2. https://www.nerdwallet.com/article/taxes/standard-deduction
    3. https://www.investopedia.com/terms/s/standarddeduction.asp
    4. https://www.investopedia.com/articles/personal-finance/041315/tips-charitable-contributions-limits-and-taxes.asp

This site is for informational purposes only. No information on this site should be construed as a solicitation, offer, recommendation, representation of suitability or endorsement of any particular security or investment. This blog represents the views of James Lenhoff and does not reflect those of Wealthquest or its employees. Opinions expressed in this commentary reflect subjective judgements of the author based on current conditions at the time of writing and are subject to change without notice.

This blog is not intended as legal or investment advice. Any discussion of a specific security or strategy is for illustrative purposes only and should not be relied upon as indicative of such security’s current or future value. Readers should consult with their financial advisors before making an investment decision.

This content is developed from sources believed to be providing accurate information, and provided by Twenty Over Ten. It may not be used for the purpose of avoiding any federal tax penalties. Please consult legal or tax professionals for specific information regarding your individual situation. The opinions expressed and material provided are for general information, and should not be considered a solicitation for the purchase or sale of any security.

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